CR strategy

Sustainability and social responsibility have played a key role in our corporate activities for more than two decades. Today, we consistently organize our core business processes on a sustainable footing. We see ourselves as a responsible company and have made that a core element of our Group strategy. We are committed to implementing sustainability along our entire value chain – and to playing an important role in meeting today’s environmental, economic, and social challenges. 

Corporate strategy: Leading European Telco“

You can find additional information on our Group strategy in the 2021 annual report.

Our CR mission

Our CR (Corporate Responsibility) strategy is derived from the Group strategy. During the year under review, we have continued to refine our CR strategy. While the CR strategy’s defining priorities remain the same, the strategy is being refined in keeping with partial overlaps that have emerged between three of the CR strategy’s action areas, “Connected life and work img – enabling a sustainable lifestyle in a digital world,” “ Connecting the ” and “Low-carbon society img.” In particular, “Enabling a sustainable lifestyle in a digital world” cannot be considered in isolation from the other two action areas. In addition, the issue of corporate digital responsibility has grown more important in recent years. We have acted on these developments by expanding the wording used in our action areas so that it now includes the concepts “Climate protection & resource efficiency,” “Digital responsibility img,” and “Digital participation.” Underpinned by clear governance, all three action areas facilitate the company’s sustainable digitalization. Other key areas of our sustainability management remain unchanged: “Data security and data privacy,” “Human rights and sustainable supply chains,” “Sustainable finance,” “Social commitment,” and “Being a responsible employer.” In addition, the principle of responsible corporate governance remains an important component of our sustainability activities.

During the year under review, we brought many of our CR topics together under the headings #GreenMagenta and #GoodMagenta, with the aim of positioning our commitment to sustainability more strongly in our communication with stakeholder groups such as employees and customers. We also use these two categories to label products and initiatives of ours that bring sustainability benefits. These labels help us increase the transparency of our CR communication. We also aim to increase transparency for CR experts by bringing our CR strategy in line with the ESG img perspectives.

Our CR action areas and focal topics

The national companies use our CR strategy to determine their own sustainability activities. An integrated organizational structure helps us to closely interlink strategic management and operational implementation of our CR strategy throughout the Group. Overall responsibility for sustainability lies with the Deutsche Telekom Board of Management.

Melanie Kubin

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Melanie Kubin-Hardewig

Reporting against standards

 

Global Compact

  • Principle 7 (Support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges)
  • Principle 8 (Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility)
  • Principle 9 (Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies)
  • Principle 10 (Work against corruption in all its forms of, including extortion and bribery)

Sustainability targets in Board of Management remuneration

In its efforts to help combat climate change, the company needs to keep its basic energy consumption from rising, even as it continues to expand the telecommunications network. This is a minimum requirement for the medium term. To this end, we are investing in measures and programs to conserve energy, across all of our energy sources. As part of our efforts to live up to our responsibility to conserve resources and protect the climate, we run various initiatives aimed at reducing our carbon footprint. In the year under review, we gave our climate goals added priority by making progress toward the targets a performance-related component of Board of Management remuneration. As of the year under review, the members of the Board of Management are incentivized to ensure that energy consumption remains at least stable in the medium term and that CO2 emissions are reduced. The basis for assessing progress toward the targets consists of the two ESG img KPIs “Energy Consumption” and “CO2 Emissions” (Scopes 1 and 2). In the year under review, energy consumption, at 13 323 GWh, remained stable with respect to the previous year. As a result especially of the Group's use of electricity from renewable energy sources, on a Group-wide basis, its CO2 emissions fell sharply against the previous year, and are now at 247 kt CO2e.

Corporate Digital Responsibility

Digitalization creates many opportunities. For example, it facilitates climate protection and resources conservation via innovations that make products more durable and energy efficient. In addition, the digital transformation is changing the workplace – via automation, for example – and it enhances our own personal everyday lives through innovations such as new mobility solutions and convenient smart-home functions. Thanks to digitalization, we can access unlimited information resources from anywhere, and we can communicate, and carry out organizational tasks, across boundaries more easily than ever before.

Day in and day out, we see our world changing, at ever-faster rates. Computers and artificial intelligence now play indispensable roles in our daily lives. Most of the time, they help us without our even noticing their operation. All of this is the beginning of a development that we can no longer stop – and that we don’t want to stop. All enthusiasm notwithstanding, however, we shouldn’t head into the digital future blindly. As we move forward, we should seek to define a clear direction and a binding framework for that future. We at Deutsche Telekom are working to bring about digitalization oriented to people and values. “Corporate digital responsibility” (CDR) refers to efforts to manage the opportunities and risks of the digital transformation responsibly. The goals of our CDR activities are twofold: to prevent negative impacts, and to help shape the digitalization process in a positive way.

Through interdisciplinary collaboration across a variety of business areas, we focus on all facets of corporate digital responsibility.

For example, we take great care to ensure that all processing of our customers’ personal data is carried out transparently and responsibly, in ways that also safeguard individual customers’ privacy and security. Further information about this area is available in our publications on data privacy, in our status report on data privacy and in our transparency report. Also, in our Digital Ethics Guidelines on AI, we describe our responsible use of artificial intelligence (AI) in connection with our products and services.

Digital participation is a core aspect of our commitment. We are working to ensure that all people have equal opportunity to be a part of the digital society. Our focuses in this regard include the technical aspects of broadband access (“access”), rates and devices that are affordable for all budgets (“affordability”), and users’ ability and desire to use digital media competently (“ability”). Many people find it challenging to use the new media, and this can be a barrier to digital participation. Via a diverse range of projects and measures, we are working to help build users’ media and democracy competence. For example, our “Teachtoday” and “SCROLLER” initiatives promote media literacy on the part of children. In cooperation with the German National Association of Senior Citizens’ Organisations (BAGSO), we are working to help senior citizens navigate the digital world. Our Digitally secure (“Sicher digital”) guide presents ten rules for digital security.

Upholding of human rights such as the rights to freedom from discrimination, to privacy, to data privacy and protection and to freedom of expression an information is a key element of responsible digitalization. We take great care to ensure that all processing of our customers’ personal data is carried out transparently and responsibly, in ways that also safeguard individual customers’ privacy and security. The obligation to respect human rights is enshrined in our basic rules and guidelines. This obligation applies not only to our company, but also to our business partners – and to our approximately 20 000 suppliers, located in a total of over 80 countries. We expressly require our suppliers to join us in our responsibility, with a view to ensuring that human rights are also respected within the sphere of influence that we have outside of our Group.

Digital responsibility img is also relevant with regard to environmental and climate-protection issues. By developing products that are innovative and sustainable, we help our customers reduce their own carbon footprints – and thereby contribute to climate protection. In addition, to help our customers find sustainable solutions, we highlight products and services that are environmentally and climate friendly. We do this with our #GreenMagenta Label (for products and services) and our Eco Rating scheme (for mobile phones). Our “Smart Innovations” also contribute to society’s efforts to improve its ecological balance. There is no getting away from the fact that the network infrastructure runs on energy. To ensure that the network’s energy requirements do not contribute to global warming, we draw 100 percent of the energy for our network infrastructure from renewable energy sources, and we are constantly working to improve our energy efficiency. We are constantly striving to reduce our impact on the environment. Our #GreenMagenta environmental program comprises ambitious climate objectives and resources-conservation measures.

Throughout the pandemic of the past two years, the world has seen how digitalization can transform the workplace with new opportunities and modes of work. We are helping to shape the digital transformation in the workplace, in a responsible manner, and we are continuing to support our employees in addressing the challenges the transformation has brought. Our efforts to reinforce our employees’ digital competencies include our “youlearn” training initiative. In addition, in close consultation with our Group Works Council, we have adopted a “Manifesto on Agile Working,” a set of guidelines for the digital workplace.

Our commitment to digital responsibility
The technological development needs to be more value-oriented. We see ourselves as having a responsibility to implement ethics within technologies and to make technologies accessible to everyone. In our Corporate Digital Responsibility framework, which we publish in 2022, we have set forth our perspectives on the far-reaching subject area of digital responsibility. In that framework, we put people in the central focus of our efforts to bring a sense of responsibility to the digital world. The centerpiece of the framework is our “House of Digital Responsibility,” which is all about human-centered technology.

The House of Digital Responsibility

Our CDR framework and our House of Digital Responsibility are both based on our guiding principles. The foundation of this basis is the commitment to act in accordance with laws and regulations, with human rights and with basic values such as cultural values. Conceptually, we place a number of key areas on this foundation – digital ethics, digital participation, the future of work, and climate protection and resources conservation. These key areas serve as orientational aids for our activities. The foundation and all of these areas, in turn, are housed under the umbrella of principles that constantly guide our efforts, namely data privacy and security, and transparency and dialog.

Outside of our own corporate sphere, our efforts and commitments in this area include active involvement in various alliances and partnerships, such as the German Association for the Digital Economy (BVDW), econsense, a network of internationally operating companies, and the Digital networking charter (Charta digitale Vernetzung). In addition, we are a member of the “Corporate Digital Responsibility” initiative (only available in German) of the Federal Ministry of Justice. In April 2021, we signed the Initiative’s CDR Codex, thereby committing ourselves to observe a set of concrete principles and to regularly publish a relevant progress report. The first report is scheduled to be published in June 2022.

Annette Reuter

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Annette Reuter

CR controlling – measuring and managing sustainability

We use an IT-based data collection system to record environmental, social, and governance (ESG img) data. It supports standardized, mandatory processes at the Group and national levels and enables Group-wide benchmarks.

We use this data primarily to calculate relevant indicators and our ESG KPIs (Key Performance Indicators), which we use to measure and control our CR performance throughout the Group. Our CR controlling ensures that we can collect ESG data and KPIs transparently, and in a timely manner, and report them in the “Management & Facts” section and the interactive benchmarking tool of this CR report.

In recent years, the issue of sustainability has grown increasingly important for our company’s strategic development. This is reflected in the fact, for example, that “Act responsibly” has been a key element of our Group strategy since 2019. Also, since 2021, calculation of Board of Management members’ remuneration takes account of development of energy and CO2e-emissions KPIs. This is one of the main reasons why, in the year under review, we added CR controlling, as a strategically relevant process, to our Internal Control System (ICS). The ICS principles defined for CR controlling are oriented to high data quality, process timeliness and transparency, and Group-wide coherence of performance indicators. In the coming years, we plan to introduce “transaction controls.” In the most important national companies, such controls will intensify internal auditing of processes relative to energy consumption and the purchase of certificates for renewable energies and CO2 emissions.

We are continuously improving our performance indicator system on the basis of internal and external requirements. In 2021, we added new performance indicators, for the areas of resource conservation and the circular economy, in order to be able to measure and communicate progress via the #GreenMagenta program transparently. 

In addition, we revised the KPIs for our social commitment.

Silke Thomas

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Silke Thomas

Our management tools – the ESG key performance indicators

ESG img KPIs (key performance indicators) are used as management tools for our CR activities. Since they are highly relevant, we also publish them in the combined non-financial statement of our annual report.
Our national companies assist in the collection of Group-wide ESG KPIs by recording CR data themselves. These national companies represent 99 percent of the Group’s net revenue.

For the purpose of integrated financial and sustainability reporting, the KPIs map all six types of capital (see diagram).

img img

Silke Thomas

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Silke Thomas

 

Reporting against standards

     

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) 

  • GRI 102: General Disclosures  

Global Compact

  • Principle 7 (Support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges)
  • Principle 8 (Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility)
  • Principle 9 (Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies)
  • Principle 10 (Work against corruption in all its forms of, including extortion and bribery)

Development of our ESG KPIs

Positive development Positive development
Insignificant development Insignificant development
Negative development Negative development

Entwicklung unserer ESG KPIs ohne konkretes Ziel Development of our ESG KPIs without a specific goal

Positive Entwicklung Positive Entwicklung Positive Entwicklung Development of our ESG KPIs in relation to set targets

Governance/Economic

2018
2019
2020
2021
21,0
21,0
22,0
22,0

ESG KPI „CDP Supply Chain Program“ (% of coverage of purchasing volume from suppliers from the Supply Chain Program)

71
63
70
72

ESG KPI „Procurement Volume Without CR Risk“ (% of procurement volume from audited direct business partners)

k.A.
k.A.
99,6
99,7

k.A.
k.A.
62
60

ESG KPI „Sustainability Revenue Quota“ (% of revenue with products and services that offer sustainability benefits)

42,0
43,0
44,0
42,0

Environmental

2018
2019
2020
2021

ESG KPI „Energy Intensity“ (Energy consumption in MWh*1000 / total IP data volume in terabytes)

163 a)
119 a)
119 a)
102 a)

ESG KPI „Carbon Intensity“ (CO2 emissions in t CO2e*1000 / total IP data volume in terabytes)

41 a)
23 a)
23 a)
a)

ESG KPI „Renewable Energy“ (share of renewable energy in total electricity consumption)

51,9
64,1
58,3
100

ESG KPI „PUE“ (Power Usage Effectiveness)

1,56
1,56
1,50
1,49

ESG KPI „Enablement Faktor“ (The ratio of CO2 savings facilitated by the use of our products and services, to the CO2 emissions from our own business activities (Scope 1-3))

1,85 b)
2,44 b)
7,05 b)
4,8 b)

ESG KPI „Take Back Mobile Devices“ (Share of mobile devices taken back in %)

3,5
3,6
4,6
3,9

ESG KPI „Take Back CPEs“ (Share of CPEs taken back in %)

k.A.
k.A.
k.A.
33,6
a) The value refers to DT Group Europe + T-Mobile US
b) The value refers to the DT Group in Germany

Social

2018
2019
2020
2021

ESG KPI „Community Contribution“ (Deutsche Telekom's financial, personnel and in-kind commitment measured in EUR million)

k.A.
k.A.
k.A.
312

ESG KPI „Beneficiaries - Focus Topics“ (Number of people involved and reached who participate in Deutsche Telekom's social initiatives in millions.)

k.A.
k.A.
k.A.
28

ESG KPI „Reach“ (Number of people and media contacts reached in million)

k.A.
k.A.
k.A.
968

ESG KPI „Employee identification with CR commitment“ ((Employee identification with Deutsche Telekom's CR commitment in %, Basis: Survey 2021))

77
84 
interactive benchmarking tool

Through our interactive benchmarking tool important facts and figures of our national companies can be analysed and compared.

Business activities and organization

Our website presents a description of our business activities, and our 2021 annual report includes detailed information about the development of our business.

Our Group is broken down into five operating segments:

Grafik: The organizational structure at a glance

We are convinced that commercial, social, and ecological aspects can complement each other. We aim to make a positive contribution to sustainable development throughout our entire value chain.

Grafik: Simplified illustration of Deutsche Telekom’s supply chain

Reporting against standards

 

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)

  • GRI 102-1, GRI 102-2, GRI 102-6, GRI 102-7, GRI 102-18, GRI 102-1, GRI 102-20 (General Disclosures)

Current organizational structure

The overall responsibility for Corporate Responsibility (CR) lies with our Board of Management; it deliberates and decides on important matters pertaining to CR. The Group Corporate Responsibility (GCR) department develops Group-wide policies and guidelines with the goal of steadily advancing the corporate culture with regard to sustainable innovation and social responsibility. As of January 1, 2022, GCR has been transferred from the Human Resources and Legal Affairs Board department into the area of the Chief Executive Officer. By taking this step, and including ESG img targets in Board of Management remuneration, we are again highlighting the great importance that Corporate Responsibility has for our Group.

In connection with the move, Birgit Klesper, who has headed the CR department for 13 years, as Senior Vice President for Group Corporate Responsibility, will hand over the leadership of the department to Michael Hagspihl. Birgit Klesper has helped the Group reach key milestones in efforts to enshrine CR in Group principles, and to emphasize the importance of CR. These accomplishments range from development of the company’s CR strategy to integration of “Act responsibly” within the Group strategy. Numerous successes such as the following demonstrate that Deutsche Telekom is well on its way to becoming a leading sustainable telco: we are listed in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index img, as the third-best telecommunications company worldwide, and as the best in Europe; we are included, for the 6th time in a row, in CDP’s “A List for Climate Change,” in recognition of our efforts to combat climate change; and we are the recipient of intense media coverage, and of a highly positive public reception, for our policies and activities against online hate speech, discrimination, and fake news. Birgit Klesper retired as of January 1, 2022. In order to always ensure a direct exchange between CR and our core business, the CR Board advises GCR. This board is made up of the heads of the main Group units.

The managements of the different business units and national companies are responsible for implementing our CR strategy. Under the leadership of GCR, they collaborate within the international CR Manager Network, with a view to coordinating their activities and learning from each other. During the year under review, the network included more than 100 CR managers, representing a total of 34 companies, in a total of 20 different countries. The international CR Manager Network’s members regularly share best practices and discuss new challenges. The agendas for the body’s regular virtual meetings in 2021 included issues relating to the European Green Deal and to the topic of impact assessment.

Our CR Policy img provides the formal, mandatory framework for the sustainability management activities at all Group units. The CR Policy has also been successfully introduced in a majority of European national companies since 2017.

Melanie Kubin

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Melanie Kubin-Hardewig

 

Reporting against standards

     

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) 

  • GRI 102-20 (General Disclosures)

Global Compact

  • Principle 7 (Support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges)
  • Principle 8 (Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility)
  • Principle 9 (Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies)

2021 CR program – targets, activities, and deadlines

In the CR program framework, we define targets and report on progress regarding their implementation. In the reporting year, we once again aligned the CR program in accordance with the four pillars of our Management & Facts section – Strategy, Economy, Environment, and Social.

Risk and opportunity management

For us, comprehensive risk and opportunity management also means considering the opportunities and risks arising from ecological or social aspects, or from the management of our company (environment, social and governance – ESG img). We actively and systematically involve relevant stakeholders in order to identify which current and potential ESG risks and opportunities are important for Deutsche Telekom. We also participate in a number of working groups and committees. We continuously track ESG issues and systematically ascertain our stakeholders’ positions on these matters.

Important tools we use for this purpose are:

  • Our risk management system, which systematically identifies, evaluates, and adresses relevant risks
  • Our (annual) evaluation of emerging risks, which provides an overview of new and long-term trends in external risks
  • Our involvement in working groups and committees, numerous national and international business associations, and social organizations (GeSI, Federation of German Industries, Bitkom, econsense, and the German National Association of Senior Citizen’s Organizations, for example)
  • Stakeholder dialog formats organized by us
  • Our various publications, such as the press review and newsletters
  • Our internal compliance evaluation, which also examines the most important sustainability risks
  • In the year under review, we refined our annual materiality assessment process by identifying and evaluating sustainability opportunities and risks on the basis of materiality analysis

In our annual report we also provide information about the following issues, which we have defined as key aspects of our risk and opportunity management:

In addition, we welcome the aims behind the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD img) and are actively working to implement them. In addition to studying physical risks, we are now also analyzing transitional risks (threats arising from sudden adaptations to climate change made by economic sectors) in detail. Detailed information on the TCFD is available here.

Reporting against standards

     

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) 

  • GRI 102-11 (General Disclosures)
  • GRI 102-15 (General Disclosures)

Global Compact

  • Principle 7 (Support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges)
  • Principle 10 (Work against corruption in all its forms of, including extortion and bribery)

Emerging risks

Every company needs to strive to predict, and prepare for, any long-term risks that could arise in the future. Although such risks are difficult to identify, they can have considerable impacts. In order to protect our company and our customers against such risks, we ther­efore need to act early and effectively to identify and evaluate them and to develop strategies for reducing them. The tasks of our risk management system, which systematically identifies, evaluates and manages relevant risks and opportunities, include considering such emerging risks for Deutsche Telekom in a comprehensive way.

Emerging risks are grouped into categories of events, including political, economic, social, technological, ecological and regulatory/legal events. The factors used to evaluate them include a risk’s newness, its rate of change, and its relevance for our industry and business in the coming years.

The following emerging risks are becoming increasingly relevant:

Technological risks
Cybercrime is growing extremely rapidly. As computing power grows exponentially, trends tied to that growth – including the digital transformation, use of devices such as computers and smartphones, and machine learning – are outpacing improvements in security.  Since the numbers of available points of attack in companies keep growing, and cybercrime keeps getting more and more lucrative, the numbers of cyberattacks will continue to increase.

The risks in this context include hackers’ use of ransomware that can block access to data and key systems (hackers can introduce ransomware into target systems by exploiting security vulnerabilities in company networks and by sending phishing emails to trick users into entering login data that hackers can then capture and use themselves). AI-supported cyberattacks are becoming increasingly autonomous and self-propagating, and able to target entire network environments instead of being limited to known or general vulnerabilities.

The security measures currently used to guard against such threats include: putting more-robust IT-control environments in place, to enhance protection against common types of attacks; use of machine-learning techniques (use of artificial intelligence for detection of network penetration, and for reinforcement and enhancement of capabilities for responding to and warding off detected attacks); improvement of malware detection; use of secure user authentication techniques; and efforts to raise users’ awareness about cyberthreats.

Environmental risks
Natural disasters such as floods, severe storms (wind, hail, tornadoes, hurricanes), heat waves, wildfires and earthquakes are occurring increasingly frequently. The physical impacts of our changing climate include ocean warming, higher levels of heat and humidity, and increasing average temperatures. Consequently, extreme weather scenarios can be expected to intensify in the future.

As more and more natural disasters occur, certain regions become more vulnerable to floods, storms and heat waves, and this relationship could increase the numbers of network failures in our network infrastructure (direct damage) and put power and water supplies at risk (indirect damage). This, in turn, could lead to losses of revenue and lower customer satisfaction.

The measures for reducing the likelihood of such network failures includes analyzing past disasters, and predicting possible future disasters, in order to identify weaknesses in areas that are particularly at risk in the face of more-severe and more-frequent disasters. Identified weaknesses in our networks would be addressed, and reinforcements introduced, in order to enhance network robustness against disasters. In addition, the company has detailed business-continuity and disaster-recovery plans in place for cases in which such failure events occur nevertheless.

Economic risks
While a given pandemic cannot be predicted, historical data show that regional and global pandemics have occurred increasingly frequently in the past few decades. A new pandemic can drastically hamper global economic growth. It can affect multiple industries and supply chains, and it can have a major impact on the ways in which we live and work.

The related risks can include increases in payment delays and payment defaults on the part of business customers and consumers, leading to increases in our bad debts. Related restrictions on public life could force businesses to close, and related travel restrictions could hamper our customer growth and reduce our roaming-traffic volume. In addition, companies could see a need to reduce their orders of IT services and equipment. Restrictions on social contacts, and requirements that instruction (schools, etc.) go online, could reduce our overall efficiency. In the case of a severe pandemic, such restrictions could reduce the size of our workforce, temporarily or even permanently. All of this could lead to revenue decreases.

Our Group Situation Center img monitors all relevant developments that could occur in a pandemic. In the framework of our crisis management, it issues pandemic guidelines, and provides suitable hygiene and health & safety equipment for all of the company’s stores, offices and infrastructure locations, in order to protect customers and employees. Other Group-wide measures that are taken to reduce the impacts of a pandemic include ramping up and stabilizing our networks, in order to ensure that they can handle additional peak loads of voice and data traffic. In the interest of minimizing infection risks, employees are permitted to work from home, and our sales and service teams are free to make adjustments to changed conditions and requirements. You can find more details on our various measures here.

Values and Guiding Principles

Corporate responsibility (CR) is based on shared values. To solidify our corporate culture, we convey the basic values of our company to all employees through binding guidelines (Guiding Principles). With various measures, such as reviews and updates, and an annual “Guiding Principles Day,” we remind employees of these values again and again, and enshrine them in our everyday work. And the measures have been successful. According to our pulse survey in November 2021, 79 percent of our employees agree that the Guiding Principles are actually being applied to our everyday work (previous year: 80 percent). The corresponding agreement figure among our executive staff was 89 percent.

In addition, we use our Code of Conduct and Code of Human Rights & Social Principles as well as the Supplier Code of Conduct to ensure that everyone at our Group and our partners demonstrates corporate responsibility in their conduct. The Codes also serve as the basis for our compliance management system, which guarantees that our business activities are in compliance with laws and regulations. We also use the Code of Conduct & Social Principles to enshrine ethical standards and, in particular, the protection of human rights, throughout the Group.

Reporting against standards

     

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) 

  • GRI 102-12 (General Disclosures)
  • GRI 102-16 (General Disclosures)

Global Compact

  • Principle 1 (Support and respect for internationally proclaimed human rights)
  • Principle 2 (No complicity in human rights abuses)
  • Principle 3 (Uphold freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining)
  • Principle 4 (Elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labor)
  • Principle 5 (Abolition of child labor)
  • Principle 6 (Elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation)
  • Principle 8 (Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility)

Certified health, safety and environmental management: almost all workstations covered

Our integrated management system for Health, Safety and Environment (HSE img) contributes at Group level to making sustainability a component of all our business processes and of our employees’ everyday lives.

It helps us to systematically plan, implement, and improve our processes in the areas mentioned. This promotes the health of our employees and also has a positive effect on their performance. It also helps us to bid on new projects in which potential commercial customers require their suppliers to provide HSE certificates.

Our Group-level HSE management system is covered by an umbrella certificate based on the international standards ISO 45001 (formerly OHSAS 18001 img) for occupational health and safety and ISO 14001 for environmental management. For some units, it also covers international standard ISO 9001 img for quality management.

Some of the national companies are not covered by an umbrella certificate because they have their own certifications, some of which are even more comprehensive. This is the case in Greece, for example. The OTE Group has an integrated management system. In addition to the above-mentioned standards, it also covers the international standards ISO 50001 img for energy management and ISO 27001 for data security.

All of our employees in Germany have ISO 14001- and ISO 45001-certified workstations. We further expanded coverage throughout the Group by the end of 2021. We were able to certify three additional locations of T-Systems ITC Iberia, a further location of Deutsche Telekom Global Business Solutions Iberia and a location of Deutsche Telekom Security GmbH to the ISO 45001 standard. Also, Deutsche Telekom Security received a second ISO 45001 certification. These certifications now cover 98 percent of our employees internationally.

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