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  • Act responsibly. Enable sustainability.
  • 2016 Corporate Responsibility Report
2016 Corporate Responsibility Report
Do you want to know the answer? Guess now...

Exactly!

Sorry, but no

The danger of data theft, online spying and cybercrime is growing. Only people who know what hackers do can protect themselves from them. That is why we train ten junior recruits to become cyber security professionals every year. Completely legally and certified by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry (IHK) . Certified hackers, so to speak.

Question 1 of 15
Is it possible to be legally trained
as a hacker?

The hacker training program

Cyber defense and security experts are hard to come by. In 2014, we decided to close this gap by offering a program to train cyber security professionals alongside their job. Participants have to place themselves in the role of a hacker and sneak their way into allegedly secure IT systems. Around 300 staff members apply to take part each year. 

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Yes, indeed!

Yes, there are!

At T-Mobile Austria, Tinka, a robot, answers customer inquiries in the online chat. She replies to inquiries regarding products and service plans and also has a personal side: she likes soccer and tells customers her secrets. 

Question 2 of 15
Are there robots on the Deutsche Telekom
customer service team?

Deutsche Telekom customer service

Providing personal customer support is very important to us. That is why our customers can speak to a personal advisor and have their calls returned. That way customers do not have to explain an issue over and over and it can be solved directly. We recently introduced the call-back service on the German market, considerably improving customer satisfaction. 

Do you want to know the answer? Guess now...

Sorry, but no

Exactly!

Children are increasingly conquering the Internet. 85 percent of twelve-year-olds in Germany are already using a smartphone "every now and then." And 20 percent of kids aged six to seven are as well. Pretty smart, those little ones! But unexpected dangers are lurking around every corner on the Internet, which is why we promote safe use of this technology.

Question 3 of 15
One-third of all twelve-year-olds in Germany regularly
uses a smartphone.

Secure surfing

"Scroller" is the name of a media magazine for children ages nine to twelve. It encourages children to reflect on their use of media and help shape the digital world. Scroller is a project that is part of our Teachtoday initiative. It promotes responsible media usage among children and young people with practical offers and activities. 

Do you want to know the answer? Guess now...

Exactly!

Sorry, wrong

One of the first automated home computers was known as ECHO IV in 1966. It was meant to regulate temperature in the house, turn devices on and off and create shopping lists. It was never introduced to market, however, Its enormous size may have been one reason for this.

Question 4 of 15
Was the first smart home computer intended to be
a shopping assistant?

Conveniently conserve resources with QIVICON

One thing is for sure: machines and products are becoming smarter. For example, nowadays it is possible to use smart home technology to easily control household devices, consumer electronics and security technology via the Internet. This helps reduce energy consumption, among other things. Deutsche Telekom's manufacturer-independent smart home platform is called QIVICON. 

Do you want to know the answer? Guess now...

Well done!

Wrong!

Robots have replaced teachers in some classrooms in South Korea. But the robot is remote-controlled from the Philippines by a real, human teacher. That way he can teach students English without an accent. Good morning, Mr. Robot!

Question 5 of 15
There are remote-controlled teachers
in South Korea.

Digital classroom

When students live too far from the next school, the school must come to them. E-learning offers have made this idea a reality. A good example: Telekom Romania provides solutions that enable Romanian children living in rural areas to attend class from home on their computers.